About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 15
CSPAN 12
CSPAN2 5
MSNBC 5
CNBC 3
WUSA (CBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 59
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
? what's out? what's in in the republican party that just took a licking? bob shrum is a democratic strategist and columnist at the daily beast, and john brabender ran rick santorum's presidential campaign. i expect you gentleman to play fair and aim directly below the belt. just kidding, bob. i want to ask you as a liberal, a progressive, looking across at the right you see jim demint, a guy the late tim russert once said i can't believe jim demint is a senator. he is the leader, the ramrod of all those right wing challenges. he put up ron johnson to beat mitch mcconnell because he's too liberal. he's leaving, quitting his senate seat, giving it up, to run the heritage foundation. we have other stuff coming up, but let's start with that. >> first of all, he's going to make a lot more money. ed fuelner, who is leaving, makes $1 million a year. demint has a net worth of $140,000. secondly, the leadership has tried to rein him in. they've said, you can't go out and go after these conservative republicans with really conservative republicans in primaries because you're setting us up to
, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in which the wall street dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize s
without a "can't lose" attitude. we'll meet a high school [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a st
that and the home town that inspires it next.. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who pre
. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor wh
. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. ♪ don't know what i'd do ♪ i'd have nothing to prove ♪ i'd have nothing to lose [ male announcer ] zales is the diamond store. take an extra 10 percent off storewide, now through sunday. >>> we're talking about fracking which is an incredibly pitch battle. it's transforming economics in the country and transforming many local landscapes places that are farms or little league fields now sporting wells. there's a rush of capital into natural gas. i think in 2011 i want to say five of the top ten performing stocks were associated with natural gas extraction. it's true. look it up. >> not the ones that i own. >> there's lots of fears about what its enviro
's go to bob in california, please, bob. >> caller: boo-yah, jim. >> boo-yah, bob. >> caller: what's wrong with fan in it's down again today after their decent earnings report. is there a possible the new ceo's performance causing a wait and see attitude in spite a spectacular performance in sales and profits? unusual in many retail stocks to see many new store openings and healthy profits going on simultaneously. fran seems to be able to do it. >> i know. you know what? here's what we're going to do with fran, because i read the numbers, like you, i saw -- because i wasn't on the conference call. but i read the numbers. i said better than expected top line, better than expected earnings. how much will the stock be up? and the stock was down. what that means is i owe you an explanation and i will come up with one for fran next week. hope for the best. but when you're dealing with washish, prepare for the worst. pay close attention to the talk shows on sunday and the roundup monday. only washington would listen. here's my call to you. no vacation without legislation. "mad money" wil
you the results on monday. next on the run down, ms. laura ingraham has some thoughts about the bob costas interview last night. later, we will read your mail on that. and then, is there a growing anti-christian bias in america? i think so. what do the culture warriors believe? those reports after these messages. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicio
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
. laura ingraham has some thoughts about the bob costas interview last night. later, we will read your mail on that. and then, is there a growing anti-christian bias in america? i think so. what do the culture warriors believe? those reports after these messages. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close frien. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offerg some of our best vals of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. giv
's bob barnard tells us, others there say that icy chill in the air needs to thaw if we're ever going to avoid that fiscal cliff. >> reporter: yes, the president and malia obama with sasha and first lady michelle leading a chorus of santa claus is coming to town. >> one. >> reporter: the ceremony of music and lights as the national christmas tree comes to life. >> i'm so excited for christmas. i can feel christmas already now. >> reporter: but the holiday cheer, the spectacle of this illuminating tradition tempered by thoughts of the looming fiscal cliff. >> he's making us wait a little bit. >> reporter: this is 6-month- old evan nicolsky. his father neil works for the department of agriculture. >> we're very concerned. i'm a federal employee. therefore that, affects us as far as sequestration is concerned and go we hope they take care of sooner rather than later. >> reporter: the national christmas tree is surrounded by smaller ones representing every state. kalani rogers and her friends are visiting from hawaii. >> i'm just worried it's going to increase taxes on normal america
up from there. and bob corker the senator from tennessee who was also on "meet the press" yesterday has proposed some legislation that instead cuts $641 million out of medicare. we'll see some scale up in that direction. there are some things that republicans could like in that initial bid. >> let me bring in congresswoman karen bass. so you're hearing all the sides going back and forth but the one thing that everybody seems to just about agree on is that we're not getting anywhere fast. lindsey graham says we're going over the cliff among others. what do you think? >> i don't believe we'll go over the cliff. i do think people are drawing a line in the sand which is a typical part of negotiation like your previous speakers said. i think that everybody understands the consequences, that the president has put forward a plan that would reduce taxes, or maintain the tax cuts for 98% of the u.s. public. and so i don't believe that my republican colleagues want to see taxes go up on 100% but they do need to come to table and counter the proposal. if they want changes and entitlements they
to the right of what we have. bob bennett, not right wing enough, orin hatch, not right win enough, john mccain not right wing -- their idea of right wing is way out, and the leader of them all is this guy who is leaving the senate. how do you see it? >> i think this is the place where the conservative movement and the republican party often times part ways, and jim demint has been the burr in the bonnet of mitch mcconnell who people on the left think of as this hard right intransigent guy because he said his top priority was making barack obama a one-term president, but really mitch mcconnell in a lot of ways is like john boehner. an old-time dealmaker. people like jim demint can't stand people like that. they feel the party has become to easy to capitulate. remember with the budget control act when democrats were screaming bloody murder and thought the president had capitulated? guess what? on the far right they thought john boehner and mitch mcconnell had capitulated and lost that negotiation. they want the party further and further to the right. what demint specializes in doing is findi
of what we have in the senate. bob bennett, not right wing enough, john mccain. their idea of right wing is way out and the leader of them all is this guy leaving the senate. how do you see it? >> this is the place where the conservative movement and the republican party oftentimes part ways. jim demint has been the burr in the bonnet of mitch mcconnell people on the left think of as this hard right in trtransigenty who said his top priority was making barack obama a one term president. mitch mcconnell is like john boehner and old time deal-maker, old-fashioned. people like jim demint can't stand people like that. they feel the party has become too easy to change. remember they were screaming bloody murder, the democrats and thought the president had done that and they feel john boehner had lost that negotiations and want the party further and further to the right. what demint specializes is doing is trying to push the party further and further to the out-skirts. >> what do you think? >> i think there is some truth to that. what is interesting to me, during the bush years, where were the
bob schieffer he's a bit more optimistic than he was a week ago. >> we were going through the cab ukee theatre, one side making an offer, the other rejecting it and that is pretty natural in any deal. but you know, they've started to tango now and you know any time you got two guys in there tangoing you got a chance to get it done. >> meanwhile urging both sides to get this done jeffrey immelt chairman of general electric spoke to charlie rose. >> i would say the business community almost universitily speaks with one voice that this needs to get done and get done now. and moving it to next year is just failure. >> jeff: you can see the full jeffrey immelt interview first thing tomorrow on cbs this morning. >> big business is to the alone in wanting to avoid the fiscal cliff. tonight randall pinkston with 9 worries of small business. >> reporter: retired army officer rod hudson runs a 13 man business that operates at the centre of national security. >> we make sampling kit it's for weapons of mass destruction. >> reporter: quickslirl analytics allow them to test for an tlex-- anthrax, c
, pastor, friend, to so many through the years. >> i was going to say, particularly, during the bob woodruff incident, he was an amazing comfort to all of us at "world news" and bob's family. >> and it's a comfort to all of us to know that he's still here. thank you, dr. tim. >>> and time, now, for "pop news." >> thank you, george. we begin this morning with some politics. and i dare say we should have you, george, give us an assist. this is a story you brought to us. >> this is david axelrod. he was president obama's strategist during the campaign. promised to shave off his mustache if the president lost pennsylvania. that did not happen. he's done it for a better cause this morning. there he is on msnbc's "morning joe" this morning. >> wow. >> he agreed to save the mustache for this. the committee for epilepsy cure. they raised $1 million. he said he would shave the mustache if they got the $1 million. and they did. you see it now. the first time his wife will ever see him without a mustache. >> unbelievable. >> first time he's had a naked face. >> do we see -- >> since he was 17
that is being managed by the real bob sullivan. the genius on the other side of the hudson. let's welcome bob sullivan. >> so, let's cut to the chase. everything san know everything there is to know. >> i am thinking of all the result is ino, and most of them he knew first. there are a lot of our solvents. it might not be me here tonight. thank you so much. we should stop right there. i'm so happy. and also -- >> that's fine. i can read from your book. >> it would be a better night. i know that it would be a better night. when i write books it is how long can you put off not writing the book. i won't write down one. and then a couple of books or ideas keep coming back. there are a lot of them, but i couldn't beat it down. the air about the war. it's foggy. the other project that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to dis
, a constant presence next to mitt romney on the trail. virginia governor, bob mcdonnell, of the transvaginal proposal and scott walker whose union fighting ways made him a darling of the tea party. just to be clear, reports of the demise of the republican party are greatly exaggerated. the gop may have taken a licking, but they will most certainly keep on ticking. still, let's not be fooled by this new herd into thinking that we have a new party. reformed from lessons of november 6th. from this class alone, governors jindal, rick perry, scott walker have signalled their refusal to set up state-run health exchanges required by the affordable care act. marco rubio, paul ryan, michele bachmann, john thune and others have sworn allegiance to grover norquist by signing on to the federal taxpayer protection pledge. all thee three of the rising stars are women that doesn't mean they support women's reproductive choices. several would deny the women the right guaranteed to them by roe v. wade. even as the new herd presents your fresh faces, it's array of gender and versatility that we in nerdland wi
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
power. what is next. major bob scales is a military analyst. general, great to see you. >> good to see you. as we look at this and we see the military there was laying low for a while. now they are popping their heads up, saying dialogue, dialogue or catastrophe. can you see a situation where they try to take over? >> i see a situation where the military acts as an intermediary, if you will. remember, to this day, the most respected institution in egypt is the army. recall that most of the rulers in the last 50 years have been military people, like nasr, mubarak, an air force fighter pilot. the egyptian people don't blame the military for the excesses over the last two years, they generally blame the police and the intelligence services. so this institution is the one that is -- is viewed as a political make-way, if this situation remains unresolved in egypt. and i might add that the egyptian military has a very strong relationship with the united states. it is not just the money. it is also the hundreds of egyptian senior officer who is had attended our schools. >> so in many way, the
, bob. we should let our viewers know, they might recognize you, you were on "fox & friends" three times in the past couple of years. >> three times. >> alisyn: when you were talking about work to help vets you didn't share were you in the middle of a crisis. take us back to three years ago, were you in china and your wife called. christy called and said there had been an accident and first didn't think it would be that bad and word came in that it was very serious. and we arranged a series of conference calls with the doctors and at one point, the doctor said to me, i asked her, how, what she thought was going to happen she couldn't tell, she couldn't guarantee he would live another 15 minutes. at that point i asked both of my brothers to find a catholic priest to give bobby the last rites. >> alisyn: bobby, do you remember the accident? >> no, i don't. no recollection at all. >> alisyn: what's the first thing that you remember afterwards? >> first thing i remember afterwards was waking up in the hospital. >> alisyn: and of course, shocked that you knew that your life was forever change
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
notches to the right of what we have. bob bennett, not right wing enough, john mccain not right wing -- their idea of right wing is way out and the leader of them all is this guy who is leaving the senate. how do you see it? >> i think this is the place where the conservative movement and the republican party often times part ways, and jim demint has been the burr in the bonnet of mitch mccandle who people on the left think of this hard right intransigent guy because he said his top priority was making barack obama a one-term president but really mitch mcconnell in a lot of ways like john boehner. an old-time deal maker. people like jim demint can't stand people like that. they feel the party has become to easy to capitulate. remember with the budget control act when democrats were screaming bloody murder and thought the president had capitulated? on the far right they thought john boehner and mitch mcconnell had capitulated and lost that negotiation. they want the party further and further to the right. what demint specializes in doing is finding candidates to primary other republic
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
success. >> we shepherded that through. i appointed bob moore who appointed someone -- >> who worked it out. >> and they talked every day, i talked to abe at least once a week until we got it done. came in under budget. >> people complained, it's too big, people won't come downtown, it's a a terrible thing, it's going to wipe out downtown. has that happened? >> heck notice. >> just the opposite. >> same as gallery place. i gave herb miller -- >> developer. >> gay hve him t.i.f.f. $75 million. look at it now. it's tripled the amount of money we get from down there. >> all those restaurants -- >> that was my style, was to make sure that the business community had access to the government, not just being bureaucratic but insistent in doing it. i remember 4000 wisconsin avenue. i woke up and they were picketing. i hadn't heard about it. i called fred green in and said, what the heck is going on? as i found out, you get the same line in dcra if you're doing $500,000 or -- >> or want to fix a fence. >> -- or want to fix a fence. i stopped that. i line over here for this big project, and li
with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen, along with bob corker and mark warner. and then at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house speaker john boehner. they also spoke about the fiscal cliff today. the president said republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. then the house speaker called on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit reduction proposal that was released earlier this week. president obama is at 9:00 eastern and then speaker boehner. at the museum today, florida senator marco rubio sat down with michaelen of "politico." he answered questions about the fiscal cliff. republican outreach to hispanic voters and a potential campaign for president. this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. you had a late night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this? >> ask him a real question. this is a great chance. >> last night you talked about a new direction for the republican party. and one of the things that
bob casey cheers this joint economic committee hearing. it is one hour and 45 minutes. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would d
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
, what was it? bob corker said that there is going to be $50,000 of deductions and i mean how many people reach that? you know. maybe you. but certainly not the vast majority of americans. and so the idea that this is going to somehow raise revenue it's a game -- it is a negotiating tool and norquist said he would calm down a little bit and not talk about people having impure thoughts as he did the other day then they won't really break his pledge. >> stephanie: right. >> what was it somebody said? i love, there was one guy that said he was going to violate norquist's pledge because his district got redrawn. >> stephanie: oh. >> so he's not officially from that district that he signed for before. that's weasel -- nailers. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: you say the terms of the fiscal cliff debate for republicans are that the only way they'll raise revenue is through the same magical loophole closing that romney ryan lost on. the senate's most pissed off munchkin john mccain said as much. he said i would be very
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)